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Fangirl | Doujinshi translator | Hetalia | Free! | Black butler

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(Source: rainbowhoney.com)

19th Apr 2014 10:40am 23 hours ago 4,589 notes

shizukan:

Free! :: Edo Period AU

(Source: shizukan)

17th Apr 2014 6:02pm 2 days ago 23,787 notes

airakanke:

tiffanydraws:

Read from right to left :)

This is a little manga I wrote to show how a girl’s efforts to make someone hurting smile ends up revealing a similar compassion from the very boy she was trying to comfort. It shows how a little kindness can sometimes seem pointless but it can be contagious and turn around to help the person giving it more than the one receiving it. 

SDOHUFodshuf omg this is so so so so so cute I love iiiit ahhh

17th Apr 2014 6:02pm 2 days ago 168,737 notes

preludetowind:

Studio Ghibli films throughout the years

17th Apr 2014 5:59pm 2 days ago 63,099 notes

nintendontdodrugs:

Dont care what anyone says, this was a fantastic movie back when I was a kid! 

The Pagemaster (1994)

17th Apr 2014 1:39pm 2 days ago 13,763 notes
17th Apr 2014 11:19am 2 days ago 505 notes
Source Via Tags: frozen,

juz-blaq:

Source (▰˘◡˘▰)

juz-blaq:

Source (▰˘◡˘▰)

17th Apr 2014 9:28am 3 days ago 2,429 notes

pkmncoordinators:

Don’t trust people who dislike Pokemon.

17th Apr 2014 9:25am 3 days ago 2,559 notes

silverlucario:

crystalswords13 :

Butterfree & Beautifly

silverlucario:

crystalswords13 :

Butterfree & Beautifly

17th Apr 2014 9:14am 3 days ago 1,935 notes
Source Via Tags: pokemon,

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK
Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.
"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

theduplicitytimes:

6 WRITING TIPS FROM JOHN STEINBECK

  1. Abandon the idea that you are ever going to finish. Lose track of the 400 pages and write just one page for each day, it helps. Then when it gets finished, you are always surprised.
  2. Write freely and as rapidly as possible and throw the whole thing on paper. Never correct or rewrite until the whole thing is down. Rewrite in process is usually found to be an excuse for not going on. It also interferes with flow and rhythm which can only come from a kind of unconscious association with the material.
  3. Forget your generalized audience. In the first place, the nameless, faceless audience will scare you to death and in the second place, unlike the theater, it doesn’t exist. In writing, your audience is one single reader. I have found that sometimes it helps to pick out one person—a real person you know, or an imagined person and write to that one.
  4. If a scene or a section gets the better of you and you still think you want it—bypass it and go on. When you have finished the whole you can come back to it and then you may find that the reason it gave trouble is because it didn’t belong there.
  5. Beware of a scene that becomes too dear to you, dearer than the rest. It will usually be found that it is out of drawing.
  6. If you are using dialogue—say it aloud as you write it. Only then will it have the sound of speech.

"If there is a magic in story writing, and I am convinced there is, no one has ever been able to reduce it to a recipe that can be passed from one person to another. The formula seems to lie solely in the aching urge of the writer to convey something he feels important to the reader. If the writer has that urge, he may sometimes, but by no means always, find the way to do it. You must perceive the excellence that makes a good story good or the errors that makes a bad story. For a bad story is only an ineffective story."

17th Apr 2014 9:06am 3 days ago 8,707 notes

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